Bronx Artists & Photographers Capture Creative Moments in New Project

Photo c/o The Bronx Artist Documentary Project Facebook

Photo c/o The Bronx Artist Documentary Project Facebook

A packed house filled the Andrew Freedman Home last Saturday at the opening reception of The Bronx Artist Documentary Project.

Connecting Bronx artists with Bronx photographers, the project opened a window into the life and work of visual artists within the Bronx. The project was the creation of The Bronx Artists Collective in 2013, when members Daniel Hauben, Judith Lane, Jeanine Alfieri, and Michael Kamber realized the Bronx was largely overlooked in terms of it’s artistic community.

A map showing the connections between artists and photographers in the Bronx. Photo c/o The Bronx Artist Documentary Project

A map showing the connections between artists and photographers in the Bronx. Photo c/o The Bronx Artist Documentary Project

30 photographers were paired up with 80 artists for the project, including Ruth Marshall, a Bronx textile artist who knits intricate pelts of endangered animals.  First getting involved with The Bronx Artist Documentary Project through Wave Hill Cultural Center, Ms. Marshall was paired up with photographer Adi Talwar.

Ms. Marshall described her collaboration with Talwar as a positive experience and was fascinated by the way he worked, “He took advantage of the natural light. I liked how he combined having me sit and work naturally while staging the composition and background around me. All in order to get the best photograph he could.”

The Bronx Artist Documentary Project not only brings the Bronx based artist community together, but it also creates awareness of the many types of artists residing in the borough.

When asked how she felt the project was important to the Bronx, Ms. Marshall responded with, “I think in terms of the Bronx having an artistic and cultural existence is somewhat overlooked by other boroughs more popular in that department. So I think it’s great that there is a big Bronx shoutout to the rest of New York City, and hopefully further afield.”

The exhibit is on view at the Andrew Freedman Home from September till October 8th, 2014. A kickstarter is underway for an art book of the project to be published, donations can be sent here.

 

 

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